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 Battlefield Desiderata

Run quickly amid the explosions and incoming fire
And remember what satisfaction there is in victory.

Shoot as far as possible, never surrender,
Be on good terms with all team mates.

Yell out commands loudly and forcefully;
and listen to your squad leaders
even to the newbies and the low ranks;
They too have their war stories.

Rebuke cowardly and passive squads;
They are of little help to the team.

If you compare your statistics with others,
You may become proud or shamed,
Because there will always be better and worse soldiers than yourself.

Enjoy your awards as well as your promotions.
Keep interested in your own advancement, however slow;
It is a virtual possession in the changing values of the Internet.

Exercise caution in your artillery strikes,
For the battlefield is full of movement.
But let this not flash you to what merit there is;
many soldiers strive for numerous kills,
And everywhere battles are full of heroism.

Be your alter ego. Especially do not pad your stats.
Do not get angered when killed,
for in the presence of claymores and AT mines,
it is as inevitable as C4 attacks.

Follow the orders of your commanders and squad leaders,
willfully disregarding your own plans for attack.

Keep a medic close by to revive you in sudden ambushes.
But do not get too distracted with UAV blips.
Many deaths result from air strikes and snipers.

Beyond the military protocols,
Be merciless to the enemy.

You are a soldier on the battlefield
no less than the generals with the stars;
You have a job to do here.
And whether or not it is known to you,
No doubt the battle is progressing as it should.

Therefore be at war with the enemy,
wherever you happen to find him.
And despite your flag captures and orders,
in the deafening chaos of the battle,
Keep your finger on the trigger.

With all of its friendly fire, base raping, and spawn killing,
It is always a dangerous battlefield.

Be careful. Strive to stay alive.

 

By Don Hodges (C) June 2006

This is a parody of the work called "Desiderata" by Max Ehrmann, 1927.

 

 

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